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    Did you know that the Sonic franchise had 4 TV shows? When I got Sonic colors a few Christmases ago, I decided to do some research on the franchise and I found that the blue blur has had several stories outside of the games, with different storylines, different cast and different gimmicks, with only Sonic, and to a lesser extent Eggman, tying them into the franchise. While most have their favorites, there is one sonic story that has gotten so little recognition that even some of the hardcore Sonic fans don’t even know about, Sonic the Hedgehog, the comic book series.

    In 1992, Archie comics began to publish the Sonic the Hedgehog comic book series, which originally followed our title character and his group of friends as they try to stop Robotnik from taking over the world. As the years passed by and head writers changed, the comic has gained more protagonists to root for and villains in the pursuit to take over the world.

    Before we continue, I want to I want to lay down 2 ground rules for this analysis. One, I will mainly be looking at the series under the most recent writer, Ian Flynn, as that is the one that matters for the rest of the series. Two, I will be refraining from comparing quality of this comic to other Sonic stories and games, because at the end of the day, an adaptation should be able to stand up on its own. With that being said, let’s get started.

    Staring out with the Art Style… well… As this comic has been running for almost 20 years, the comic has gone through a plethora of artists. At the beginning of the Flynn run, several of the artists had “distinct” ways on drawing issues. While Sonic characters can difficult to draw, in the earlier would draw them with eyes covering more of their heads than usual, human body proportions, and backgrounds look splotchy or indistinguishable. However starting around issue 160, Tracy Yardley took over for most of the comic art. While Yardley can be lazy with drawing background characters as they have less detail placed into them and can have problems with facial emotions on occasion, he has been able to perform well in most of his tenure, as he has been able to draw fantastic background scenery. Later on, more artist such as Ben Bates, Steven Butler and Jamal Peppers joined on to the art team. Each one them bring their own style that all complement the characters and the story in a comic format. The art for the action scenes can look completely amazing as spin-dashes and other action elements would look smooth and crisp.

    To mention the other Sonic shows for a moment, each one of them tried introducing a fantasy gimmick for their series to add to the Sonic lore. Adventures being a wacky, fantasy world, Satam in a “dark” fantasy world (more on that later), underground with musical weapons, etc. Sadly, this series does not have a fantasy gimmick, and by that, I mean the series barely has any fantasy. The series does use 2 fantasy elements, magic and technology, but neither are used in an efficient way. Instead of using either as a metaphor for an idea or trying to use them in a new and upscale way, both elements are used in very typical methods. Nanobots, for example, are used to build a city or create a suit or magic being used for mind control are concepts that have been used better in other series and Flynn writing doesn’t subvert or add to what has been done, mainly because but they are usually used to whatever the story need them to be used as. Which is even more of a shame because, the series never really tries to create any concepts that haven’t been done before. All the locations are basic forests, deserts and cities, weapons are ones that already exist in our world with no interesting add-ons.

    What about the action in the comic? Well, one of my main inspirations for my taste in action in stories is Shonen anime such as One Piece or Bleach and even at their laziest or contrived; they always introduce a new battle mechanic or fighting style. Hell, One Piece, has filled books solely on detailing its fantasy and action elements. Archie’s Sonic, other hand, most of the fighting is punching, kicking, and bland swordplay, and maybe a spin dash if you’re lucky (also, Tails has now learned Tail Whip). Even ignoring my tastes, the action in this series can be pretty underwhelming. Yes, it does look impressive, but it never does anything impressive.

    However, while this series does lack a fantasy gimmick, it does have a gimmick. This series has romance! Yes, the series uses romantic subplots in the flow of its fantasy-oriented storyline. While it has dialed back under Flynn, it still is used a source of tension between characters. If this is the first time you have heard of this you are hearing this, you are probably saying something along the lines of, “WTF?”. Before I continue, let me refute a couple of complaints I tend to hear when people find out about this.


1) Sonic shouldn’t have romance! It’s for kids!
2) Ugh! Great, furry romance drama.


    Here is the thing, if there is any age group that needs to be talked to about romance, it would be kids. As most kid’s media tends to over romanticize love and place it in fairy tales, it sets expectations about what love should be like, even though finding true love in 3 days is not practical. Taking a mature, realistic approach to discussing romance would be a very interesting move for any story to make as even adult media usually takes mature for backstabbing, manipulation and being moronic. Moreover, using furry characters could just be another way to do it. However, if I were going to list an example of this concept done right, Archie’s Sonic would be the last series I would use.

    I was originally planning to go on a tirade on how this series ultimately fails at using romance by pulling out multiple instances of it story wise. But after looking at what I wanted to say, not only would this analysis become way too long, the issues I would bring up would be ones with how romance in used in fiction in general. While I will still use Sonic examples in it, I will probably make that rant its own analysis. So, instead let’s focus on the main reason why the romance fails here. It adds nothing. Nothing in the narrative requires romance to further the overall story. None of the characters are stated to have relationship or interpersonal connection issues and the message of the story has nothing to do with relationships. Therefore, the story will sometimes break away from the actual premise to have romantic main-plots or worse will combine the two using many clichés seen on many CW Dramas. Misunderstandings, jumping to conclusions, having them finally get together only to have one of them be kidnapped or placed in a coma, and many other painful ways. It also doesn’t help in developing the characters as many characters involved in romance will end with it being there main or only drive or connection to the story, making them seem very shallow. The fact is romance works best in fiction when it is primarily a character study by first fleshing out characters individually, then developing platonic relationships, using that to display why certain characters would work in a relationship. However, looking at how the character writing for this comic works, “character study” is not a term the writing staff is familiar with.

    Starting with the Game characters, Flynn has this weird habit of doing one of two thing with them. Some, he will crank the personality traits up to eleven.  Sonic, for instance, always has something of an arrogant streak, has several moments where he will blatantly insult characters, even the good guys and will always have a cocky expression even in scenes where even the most laid back character would be serious. This would be fine if this was supposed to be a part of his character arc and he was growing from this over time, but he never changes his attitude over the story, he just apologizes if it is too blatant and the story moves on. Shadow, Rouge and Silver also suffer from this writing style as well. The rest? Well, he distill their main trait associated with their character, not making them boring, but making them somewhat dull. Knuckles, who is serious when appropriate, isn’t naïve or thick-headed in any way. While I am glad he isn’t acting like an idiot, but as one of his main traits isn’t represented or replaced, he isn’t left much character.  Amy, Omega and Tails seem to be the only exception to these rules but for different reasons. Omega is the deadpan of the cast, having some of the “best” one-liners of the cast. Amy does have her many trait watered down, but since main trait is being a stalker with a crush to Sonic, she is left to being a “more” likeable, albeit stereotypical, chick role to the cast, but more on that later. Tails well he gets grouped into the Archie cast writing. What does that mean?

    Well, even with all of the problems that the SEGA cast has, they are the ones that give the comic life and personality, and are usually the ones that help drive the plot forward. The Archie cast…let me put it like this. I can’t call them talking bricks… Mainly because that implies that, they have any characterization. It amazes me that these characters, who have been in this comic for almost 20 years, have been so poorly developed, if they are developed at all. Most of them lack back-stories, clear motivations or even personalities. You could literally switch dialogue between these characters and never notice. While most of these problems started before Flynn became head writer, his writing has not helped things. His writing style exacerbates the problem by retconing what little is consistent about them. Turing several characters into moles and traitors for lame drama or having a passive character turn into Yellow Owl to draft him into the plot as a fighter (if you get this reference, I love you). Speaking of Rotor, many of the males, including Miles Prowler (I am not about to start rhyming), are written or are re-written, to be Sonic-lite. They are snarky, shoot off one-liners, maybe not as cocky, but just as much as action junkies as Sonic. Which is weird for characters like Rotor, Tails, and Antoine, as they are established to be on some level of timid and fainthearted. Even if this justified by them wanting to be more like Sonic, what is the point of having so many characters written the same way? The females aren't any better as they mainly end up as the "down to earth" counterpart for the males and usually don’t get anything to do.

    If you read my Sally analysis (Link in the description, take a read if you want later), I ended by saying that Sally character would most likely not be improved with the upcoming reboot. This is pretty much the reason. Flynn is not a character writer. He will make a character fit whatever story idea he has, and since Sally is written to be a writer’s plot tool, she is probably going to get worse before she get better. Hell, he is even adding another cast member to the leads. Why is he adding another character when he still hasn’t developed the 6 to 9 leads he already has. I know Flynn is a story focus writer, but good story-writers have consistent characters that fit into their stories naturally.

    Since he is sacrificing or skipping so much for his story, this must be the redeeming feature for the series, right? Now some of the critics of this series might get on me for saying this, but it does need to be said, Flynn has great story ideas. Many of the ideas are interesting from either the franchise perspective, a producing perspective or a good moral conundrum. Sonic vs. Tails, the introducing of the Sonic Universe line to expand the world, or turning Nicole fully real to flesh out the idea of technology being the foundation of a society. The Problem? He is good with setting up ideas, horrible with execution. While I don’t what to go through every last arc Flynn has written, almost every last arc suffers from one of two things. They story will be resolved easily or the plot will end up being forgotten. Several arcs that Flynn sets up as being important to the story end up turning into filler that add nothing to the overall narrative. The Nicole subplot, the Genesis arc, the Silver traitor plot line, and the X-years later arcs are just a few examples. While these could have excused by being too dark or not having enough time to flesh out properly, (which is still a poor excuse), it means very little when other arcs get resolved, but with no effort placed from the characters, such as easily finding the item needed to defeat the bad guys.

    While this is lazy writing in general, this writing style hurts the comic’s goal to be serious. The whole point of adding romance, changing characters and interjecting conflict is to have the story be dramatic. While I am all for the Sonic franchise to go in different directions, but if it’s going to go against type, it should do it well. Even if arcs are built up well and have tons of natural tension, it’s undercut if every arc can be solved by having little to no effort for the cast to solve it. In addition, with taking itself seriously, the writer omits one thing every dramatic story should have, a message. Going dramatic is only beneficial when the drama is there to emphasize a point or moral. What idea or message is the story trying to get across? The troubles of relationships? Doubtful as the story nor characters every do anything outside of general romance clichés. Is it “Always have a smile on your face in hardship”? While that might apply to Sonic, most of the characters walk around with scowls during dramatic and actions scenes. Good will always triumph over evil? Not only do the easy resolutions of plots undercut this message, that is usually the message of every superhero comic, the most common genre in the comic book medium. So not only is this derivative, it’s horrible at being derivative. I know many could excuse him because of the SEGA mandates, but… You know what? Let’s wrap this up on the mandates because I am tired of hearing this excuse.

    One of the most consistent rumors I have heard from behind the scenes is that Flynn has a list of mandates that he has to follow while writing the series and many critics and defenders cite these as the problems in the comic.

1) Sonic must NOT cry.
2) Sonic must be indefinitely single
3) Sonic characters must not have parents or relatives
4) Sonic and other SEGA characters must act a certain way
5) Sonic and other SEGA characters cannot be changed in any way, unless SEGA approves
6) Sonic and other SEGA characters must not die
7) Sonic and other SEGA characters must not experience any sort of meaningful loss.

    Why am I tired of hearing this? Because these do not excuse any of the issues the series has. Let’s ignore the several times Flynn has broken some of these and even go the extra mile and say there more mandates than this. It makes sense that SEGA would be protective of their characters as they have to market them in future games, TV shows and merchandise and people do tend to get “defensive” about change. Why should SEGA trust Flynn to write and develop the game characters, when he has a hard time developing the characters he has complete creative control over? He has barely used these concepts with other characters that he has control over and hasn’t really gotten any true development out of them. Granted they haven’t taken away from the characters, but he hasn’t shown that risk would be worth it. Besides that, every mainstream writer has mandates about what they can and cannot write about, especially writers for franchises. Even if SEGA might be a bit stricter, it is the job of the writer either to fight them or to compensate for them. While Flynn has his moments of brilliance, they do not balance out years of lazy writing.

    I know I seemed a bit hard on Flynn, heck I couldn’t even call the series bad. However, I have no problem calling the series aimless. It sacrifices characters, creative fantasy and light heartiness for a dramatic story for no real purpose. I know some people like to blame SEGA or past writers for the difficulties the comic has, while I do not think they are blameless, it is the job of the writer to make the greatest story possible and this is not. The only thing I complement this on is the art style and at least the effort to make the story drama. Leaving this at a very pretty but very shallow mess.

Final rating: 1.5/5

But, like I said I do think Flynn does have his moments and we will talk about one next time.

Next post: Character Analysis- Amy Rose
(NOW wiith grammar corrections!!!!)
Do think I hit the mark or way off target? Leave a comment below and tell the world what you think.

Sally Acorn Analysis: laviarray.deviantart.com/art/S…

After a some procrastination, I finally go this finished. YAY!!! Now for a bit of news

1) Thanks to all of the comments and complements of the Sally acorn. It really means a lot to me.
2) while I do plan on posting Sonic themed analysis for a few more future post, I would like to move into doing other franchises and characters. I do not plan on abandoning Sonic themed stuff but it will be spaced out.
3) Also if you have any recommendations for characters or stories, feel free to comment below.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconlogiteeka:
LogiTeeka Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Least now, Ian doesn't have worry about the old continuity. Many fans might've grown up with it, but personally, I'm kinda glad it's gone. The comic was in desperate need of a reboot for some time, and it finally arrived.

In fact, I dare say the reboot is much better than the previous continuity. At least now, things feel more consistent and it's easier to fallow.
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Me too. Really most of the past continuity was more of a hindrance than a helper. The extra characters, the bloated plotlines, the unnecessary villains.  


I kinda dropped after the 2nd issue of the underwater arc, since it was continuing the same problems I had with the past continuity, but a fresh start couldn't hurt.
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:iconlogiteeka:
LogiTeeka Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
During Penders'/Bollers' run on the comics, it was a major problem. But when Ian took the wheel, he managed to make the uninteresting elements interesting and somehow managed to tie them to the Sonic mythos everyone's familiar with (as they should've been in the first place). It was like he came across a messy sandbox and creatively reshaped all the sand into a nice-looking castle (not perfect, but much better than before).

Sadly, the new continuity lacks much of the older elements for him to play around with. Only aspects originating from SatAM and some forgotten/rejected game extras are available to build upon; everything else has to be created by him, since he's not allowed to add anything original to the official game cast. But so far, he still manages to pull through; having introduced several new characters that have already become fan-favorites.

Aww... That's disappointing. The story arc started to get better directly after that issue.
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Seriously? How?
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:iconlogiteeka:
LogiTeeka Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
To what exactly? The writing, or the story arc?
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Either. Really, How did it get better?
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:iconlogiteeka:
LogiTeeka Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Well, for starters, it doesn't dwell on the whole politics-thing for long since Dark Gaia's minions attack the city; and in the end (after a major battle involving Chaos and Tikal), the King and Queen realize their mistake and ask for forgiveness from Coral.
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:iconsundayflower:
sundayflower Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2013  Student General Artist
One thing I think you should've touched upon is what passes for humor in the series nowadays. It's almost like a case study on why you should never hire fans to write for your licensed comic book. Ian Flynn seems to operate under the impression that if he repeats enough song lyrics or quotes from the games, maybe throws a few tired old internet memes in for good measure, it will be enough to make the readers laugh. It really doesn't work because of the problems you've outlined with the characters and makes him look unoriginal and lazy as a writer.
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I wanted to but I couldn't find a natural place for it to work. I completely agree, whenever I see jokes in the comic, I always try to figure out how I could make them better, but honestly I would have never introduced many of those jokes in the first place. (Shadowman?)
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:iconlogiteeka:
LogiTeeka Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
In hindsight, the comic is targeted towards fans of the series. They're the main selling point, thus the humor reflects what they're familiar with.
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I guess, but reference humor should not rely on author's notes to get across.
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:iconlogiteeka:
LogiTeeka Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I don't recall most of the humor requiring notes to explain the jokes, but I do agree that they're really overusing editor's notes. It's as if they're scared that newer readers will be unfamiliar with the comic lore, so they need to explain who the characters are and what function they serve in every issue released; despite them having an entire introduction page in the beginning of each issue which can help save space.

Not a major problem though, just a minor nitpick of mine.
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:iconthesoniczone11:
thesoniczone11 Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
How is "Shadow Man" a joke? 
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
During the megaman crossover, the sonic character get turned into robot masters and their names are changed from tails to tailsman, knuckles to knucklesman, etc. As Sonic and Megaman where fighting them, they run into Shadow as a master and one of the Megaman bosses, shadowman. For comedy, Megaman and Sonic get them mixed up and end up fighting a different Shadowman.
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:iconthesoniczone11:
thesoniczone11 Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yeah yeah, I'm aware of what happened. But it's mostly just a funny coincedence. Like the Vector Man thing.
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Which would be fine if the just a coincidence, but the comic tries to pass this off as its actually funny. I know it isnt the best example, but it was the one that came to my head first.
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:iconsundayflower:
sundayflower Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2013  Student General Artist
I can understand not finding a good spot to bring it up. It is a pretty minor thing when you consider everything else wrong with the comic.

Can't comment on Shadowman because I stopped reading a little after the Genesis arc and I've never cared all that much for Megaman. Is the cross-over any good?
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
it has its moments. To be honest, i have only been glazing through it. There have been a few moments that i found interesting like Sonic and Megaman playing Rock paper scissors to to see who they fight, most of it I found annoying like the constant reminding of Dr. Wiley and Dr. Eggman wanting to turn on each other for several issues.
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:iconsundayflower:
sundayflower Featured By Owner Aug 17, 2013  Student General Artist
So business as usual. I don't know why I expected anything more.
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:icone-122-psi:
E-122-Psi Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2013
Some actual character based jokes would be nice, though the few we get are what remain of actual personality establishment (odd subtle gags of Antoine acting pompous again).
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 17, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I completely agree, most of my favorite comedies rely on character jokes. It would be nice to see them crack some actual jokes with the sega and archie casts
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:icontoaarcan:
ToaArcan Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
This is the single most accurate description of the humour in the comic. As Matthew Buck said: "References do not equal jokes." It's something that will make the older fandom snicker, but it's not actually funny.
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I know what you mean, the references both the jokes and bubbles are annoying. The jokes usually funny as they usually just state the obvious and dont really add to anything. The bubbles pointing to other comics are also kind of annoying. While I am not against getting extra info, they are distracting as the story uses them as a lame attempt at continuity instead of trying to make the arcs be able to stan on their own.
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:icontoaarcan:
ToaArcan Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Agreed.

And let's not get started on the memes.
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:iconlouis-the-hedgehog:
Louis-the-Hedgehog Featured By Owner Aug 12, 2013
So much better than that "it's just kids stuff" excuse.
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yeah, I hate this excuse. Even when writing stuff for kids, that only means keeping things somewhat simple, not being lazy at general story telling. I never really let that be an excuse for contrived writing.
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:icone-122-psi:
E-122-Psi Featured By Owner Aug 31, 2013
Have to agree. In fact I find it ironic that most of the time kids shows can actually make more depthful characters, since they're less afraid of keeping up a dignified approach and aren't afraid of making quirks and moral driven stories. Even pre school shows like Winnie the Pooh and Thomas the Tank Engine surpass Ian's writing because they involve the characters' personalities driving the story and even developing legitimately. That's how underestimated lighthearted writing is.
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:icone-122-psi:
E-122-Psi Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013
Agree completely on the character analysis here. Even worse since even for those handful of characters he does get more accurately, they still don't exactly pivot the story or make unique changes according to their personality, something even the games versions such as Amy do on frequent occasions. The only character that seems to make exception is Sonic, and even that is usually in a consistently negative case and cranking up his flaws to an extent he is a completely unlikable jerk. 

It is even more blatant due to the fact he does seem to be actively trying to place key shortcomings into the cast, but fails, usually giving them informed ones or random compressed vices. Not to mention half the time it seems more for the sake of fan appeal than to build on the character (eg. most of Sally's 'flawed' moments seem more just to get the Mary Sue whiners off his back than round off her personality). I can't stand how people label Antoine's treatment in the comics as 'development' as it implies that the only way to make a well rounded character is to take away everything that makes them unique so they are blandly competent and obedient soldier.

Granted it doesn't seem as much a consistent problem with Ian, he did a much better character dynamic in some issues of Sonic X. Similarly some of the villains in the comic are rather well rounded. This leaves me to believe that he has one of either two writing cliches:

1. Having much more ease writing villains or anti villains than heroic characters.
2. Is trying to hard to make his work be taken seriously and thus downplays all the 'silly' exaggeration qualities of the cast that usually make their personalities.
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:icone-122-psi:
E-122-Psi Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2013
I have to agree with a comment you got on SEGA forums however, and note that the majority of these problems didn't actually start with Ian. If anything Penders and Bollers exacerbated the pretentious bland setup of the comics ten times worse than he did. Most of the cast haven't really been truly 'alive' since the earlier comics made by Gallagher, most of which were cringingly cheesy.
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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I should have stated this a bit harder, than glazing over it and I will update the post to reflect this. While many of the problems I listed were started in previous writers runs, Flynn has had this series for more than 90 issues plus the 50+ with Sonic Universe. If he wanted to make changes to any of the characters, he could've and should've by now.
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:icone-122-psi:
E-122-Psi Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2013
Fair enough. There's such a huge convoluted mass of points for each writer, it's probably better to discuss them individually anyway.

I think it has played part into why the Freedom Fighters are such polarizing characters, they tend to be written by people who aren't great at defining personalities, even in Satam there were some blatant problems making them all stand out. It's also somewhat ironic since usually the writers that are nearest to getting them right are the comedic ones, despite all the dignity and darkness so many attempt to put into their dynamic.

I admit I'm not I find the 'Freedom Fighter' concept overall a bit flawed though, compared to other medias like the games where most of the cast have their own motives and roles, the comics require them all to be of the same basic alliance and act as generic soldiers, which I think adds onto the idea so few of them are allowed to be individual and define themselves.
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:iconmarkwilder:
MarkWilder Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013

I agree with this 1000%! Thank you for this truthful analyses of this comic!

 

The characters, the focus, and the style indeed need to stop substituting structure for derivative nonsense, and the plots need to be handled with much more care, for this comic to improve.

 

I look forward to your other analyses. :)

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:iconlaviarray:
LaviArray Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thanks! And hopefully the next wont have to be as long.
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:iconmarkwilder:
MarkWilder Featured By Owner Aug 9, 2013
Hopefully. :)
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:icondarkmarkmsx:
DarkmarkMSX Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013
You have hit the nail on the head again, my friend.

You make an interesting point about the action scenes. I have to admit, the only time the series really "wow"-ed with its action was in 175, when Sonic pushed his speed to the limit and slammed into Eggman at millions of miles per hour (and somehow not only failed to do more than dent Eggman's shield, but also didn't break any bone in his body). Other than that, I can't really recall any memorable action scene. I remember the battles themselves, but not really what happens in the battle.

Another interesting point you made was the series' lack of a real fantasy gimmick. You know, that may be why Flynn is trying his hardest to make the comic like the games: so he can acquire the fantasy gimmicks from there.

Thank you for mentioning the romance. I'll post what I think about THAT pink elephant in your eventual analysis.

The bit about bland characters and how the story, not the characters, drives the comic is probably THE chief reason I don't like the comic. Even though the comic can have good stories, what's the point of it all if I can't get invested in the characters or they keep changing around so I'm not sure whether to root for them or not? Also, I'll have to disagree with you about Omega; he has become nothing more than literal cannon-fodder comic relief IMHO, which places him under the "cranking traits up to eleven" cast. As for Amy...well, I'll post my thoughts about her portrayal in the comic in your next analysis.

Yes, Flynn's problem is not his ideas, but his execution. He's stated before that executive meddling does interfere some (for example, the reason the story in 175-6 was so rushed was because SEGA mandated that Eggman couldn't win for more than one issue), but if that's the case, he should be able to change the story so it CAN work.

About the mandates, THANK. YOU. The mandates may be hindrances, but they are not the primary culprits for the comics' mediocrity.

Also, that final bit about the series being aimless really strikes home. There are no morals, no real development, no end goal to said development, no main point to anything, so what's the point of going all dark on us? In all honesty, I really do think the series takes itself too seriously, and I just realized that the reason this is the case is because the comic IS aimless.

One nitpick before I finish: you might want to proofread your analyses a little more. This one had a fair number of wording errors. Just a bit of advice; you still get your points across pretty well.

In conclusion, awesome analysis. Keep doing these, man; they're extremely insightful.
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:icontoaarcan:
ToaArcan Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Very well said.

I'm certain that, with SEGA becoming more heavy-handed as of late, Sally, Nicole, and co. aren't going to get better. After all, they aren't SGEA cast members, no matter how much Archie try to make them fit in, so they'll always be sidelined.

Also, you hit the nail on the head with Flynn's style: He can come up with some great plot ideas (I'd probably like a lot of the stuff he did if these were OCs... wait, I have... issues... with Sonic OCs. Nevermind), but they don't work with the characters, so he hastily bashes the square peg into the round hole and moves on with it. Fiona, Ken, Sally, Rotor, Silver, Rouge, Geoff, Sonic, Bunnie, Tails, Erma, etc have all had this lately, in more or less that order (Not counting repeat offences).

Another thing that I think is worth noting is that all of the characters are way too trigger happy, and eager to solve their problems with a good old-fashioned bum rush, as opposed to talking things over and trying to solve a problem without breaking someone else's face. While it could work for characters with short tempers like Sonic, Knuckles, or Amy, it's especially jarring from Tails (House of Cards), Sally (Bold New Moebius), and Amadeus (Also House of Cards), who are supposed to be logical and collected- hell, it was the whole reason that the former two both worked so well as a Lancer to Sonic.

Finally, there's the fact that compassion is entirely misplaced. All too frequently, the heroes will offer sympathy to unrepentant monsters like Eggman or Scourge, but will go beyond simple retribution and become outright callous towards their fallen friends who they should really be trying to reach and help, not hate and condemn, like Fiona and Geoffrey. Both of these occurences got me rather annoyed- Geoffrey is at the lowest point he could reach: He's in the middle of a public breakdown, over the death of his wife, no less, and has flat-out admitted that he turned because he has nothing left to live for. So Sonic openly mocks him, despite him also losing Sally under similar circumstances the day before. Fiona has also showed up without any great requirement- she doesn't need to assist the heroes to get Lightning back. She also doesn't immediately attack them- Sally instigates the fight, and she's the first to suggest that they talk things over instead. She is also perfectly willing to let them go without a fight afterwards. She's separated from Scourge, and all they need to do is inform her that Scourge was going to nuke Mobius with her still on it, and encourage her new direction in life, and they've brought her several steps back to the light, which will not only eliminate an enemy, but at the same time, win them back their field medic (Gee, that would have been useful in 234), and, better yet, remove all hope Scourge has of escaping the No Zone. Instead, Sally treats her like shit for the entire story, despite her never being that familiar with Fiona before she turned, her not being affected at all by Fiona leaving, her evidently not being worried about Sonic's feelings considering what she was up to with Ken at the time, and Tails having forgiven Fiona as early as 178-9.
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:iconhallowpointpaws:
HallowpointPaws Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist

Could always use my backstory where Sonic's "world" is just the interior of ours and what people describe when they talk about the "hallow earth theory". The "Mobians" are the descendants of some animals that were used in Nazi experiments in making the "perfect man" but the Nazis didn't get humans with a few animal traits here and there like they were expecting, the got animals with a few human traits who were able to use their newfound abilities to read and operate technology to escape and overpower their creators, basically The Secret of NIMH meets The Island of Dr. Moreau. 

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:icontoaarcan:
ToaArcan Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Seriously? Nazis have no place in the Sonic series. We have enough of an oversaturation of them in pop culture as is, thanks to the Call of Duty crowd. We get it, they were bad peole. But really, I don't want to look at my childhood heroes and think "This was all thanks to Hitler." Godwin's Law is a bad thing. The idea is that you keep Hitler out of things, not introduce him. Not to mention that, you know, things surrounding the Nazis, especially their experiments, are horrendously offensive in many cultures, thanks to them being performed on said many cultures. You're also missing the part where a lot of the criticism that has been levelled at this arc is that it's too dark. Because, you know, Nazis make everything lighter and softer, right?

It's simple: Mobius is another world, or is Earth several thousand millenia in the future, after humanity has mostly died out, and evolution has taken its course. No alien invasion, just natural selection creating something else with opposable thumbs, except this one can also run faster than a human.
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:iconhallowpointpaws:
HallowpointPaws Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Well it isn't like I ever actually expected Sega or Archie to actually use that idea.
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:icontoaarcan:
ToaArcan Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Probably because it's crazy.
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:iconhallowpointpaws:
HallowpointPaws Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
And like you said, it might be looked at as "offensive" and controversial or because most people don't want a history lesson in their video games and comic books.
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:icontoaarcan:
ToaArcan Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
A theory that doesn't work because we already know the composition of the Earth doesn't count as a history lesson.
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:iconhallowpointpaws:
HallowpointPaws Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes, the earth has been proven to be solid, but hedgehogs have also been proven be colors like gray or brown and can't even come close to running at the speed of sound. In a story with talking animals that can do things like run at the speed of sound, build airplanes out of scratch, levitate or manipulate objects with their minds, one is entitled to a little fantasy here.
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:icontoaarcan:
ToaArcan Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
True.
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(1 Reply)
:iconmasterfusion:
MasterFusion Featured By Owner Aug 8, 2013
You're hit the mark. Which is why I'm making a reboot.
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